A Stab at Life

24 year old nerdfighter and museum studies grad student interested in science-fiction, informal education, gaming, web comics, and writing.

linddzz look at how cute! Like a mini Luna!

linddzz look at how cute! Like a mini Luna!

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via lindseymaryquitecontrary)

“Patriarchy has always seen love as women’s work, degraded and devalued labor. And it has not cared when women failed to learn how to love, for patriarchal men have been the most willing to substitute care for love, submission for respect. We did not need a feminist movement to let us know that females are more likely to be concerned with relationships, connection, and community than are males. Patriarchy trains us for this role. We do not need a feminist movement to remind us again and again that love cannot exist in the context of domination, that the love we seek cannot be found as long as we are bound and not free.”

—   Communion: The Female Search for Love by bell hooks (via thechocolatebrigade)

(via the-feminist-fangirl)

songandcrest:

Native Women Are….
for more posts on Native culture, hiphop, and race.

“I had a boyfriend not so long ago who, whenever we got into an argument, would accuse me of “going soap opera.” “Here comes Telemundo!” he would shout. His (clearly gendered and vaguely racist) insult was supposed to make me feel like my anger wasn’t valid—that it was frivolous and silly, that I was being overly dramatic. This was his not-so-subtle way of trying to shut me up—by accusing me of being emotional. (Unlike men, whose anger is always logical, of course.) Unfortunately, calling me out like this often worked. It felt immobilizing to be called dramatic. Even if you know you’re being reasonable, we’ve internalized sexism so much, sometimes we even begin to doubt ourselves.”

—   

from Jessica Valenti’s He’s a Stud, She’s a Slut and 49 Other Double Standards Every Woman Should Know.

I wish I had read this a couple years back because this was my life.

(via giraffescanbefeministstoo)

Gaslighting

(via pinkpolitiks)

I have a special spot in my heart for this book because it was the first feminist book I ever read. Before reading this, despite the fact that I noticed frequent inequalities between the sexes, I was one of those people who hated using the term “feminist” to describe myself because of the negative connotations. This book helped me realize I wasn’t being “oversensitive” or “looking too far into things” when I noted things that made me uncomfortable. I was seeing sexism. Although my feminism has grown and advanced since I first picked up this book as a teenager, I will always have a place in my heart for Jessica Valenti because helped me not be afraid of the word feminist and for that, I thank her.

(via the-feminist-fangirl)

(via the-feminist-fangirl)

“The message that we send when we don’t represent the broader culture in our stories is that ‘You are other’. As a community, as an organism, it is a thing that makes us ill. It is actually bad for us.”

—   Kelly Sue DeConnick (kellysue) , speaking about the continuing need to diversify the kind of characters that appear in comics, as part of the ECCC panel—Broadening Comics Readership. (via robot6)

(via wilwheaton)

rroserade:

sources: [1] [2] [3] [4]

also an addendum to the hunger games slide, when they put out a casting call for the role of Katniss, they specifically asked for only caucasian actors to audition, which left out any possibility for any amazing PoC actors to have been discovered.

i hope this was informational and i didnt leave anything major out. if anything is wrong or needs to be updated, message me and i’l fix any fallacies!

(Source: lapris, via the-feminist-fangirl)

grimmzai:

airyairyquitecontrary:

freakishlyawesomestuff:

Baby bat yawning

I AM THE NIGHTthe night is sleepy

Oh my gosh

grimmzai:

airyairyquitecontrary:

freakishlyawesomestuff:

Baby bat yawning

I AM THE NIGHT
the night is sleepy

Oh my gosh

(via kandell)

setscarylazerstomaximumcaptain:

kellyluck:

thatssoscience:

What Happened to the Computer Girls? 
Believe it or not, in the 1960’s, programming was seen as women’s work. It was even touted as being “just like planning a dinner”.
So what happened?
Eventually male programmers wanted to raise their status above “women’s work”. So they actively discouraged women from these positions, designed hiring tests rigged for men, and even created the stereotype that programmers are disinterested in people. No wonder in the years since, it’s still a male dominated field. Women earned only 18% of the computer science degrees awarded in 2008-2011. 
Alright ladies, we need to bust this myth. It’s been too long. Find organizations like Scientista or Sally Ride Science that help encourage women and girls in STEM interests. Find mentors and connect with other women interested in STEM. 

This’s true. Especially since computers really got up and going during WWII and most of the available workforce was, you guessed it, women. At Bletchley Park, for example, women outnumbered men 4 to 1.

BLACK GIRLS CODE
BLACK GIRLS COOOOODDEEEEE

setscarylazerstomaximumcaptain:

kellyluck:

thatssoscience:

What Happened to the Computer Girls? 

Believe it or not, in the 1960’s, programming was seen as women’s work. It was even touted as being “just like planning a dinner”.

So what happened?

Eventually male programmers wanted to raise their status above “women’s work”. So they actively discouraged women from these positions, designed hiring tests rigged for men, and even created the stereotype that programmers are disinterested in people. No wonder in the years since, it’s still a male dominated field. Women earned only 18% of the computer science degrees awarded in 2008-2011. 

Alright ladies, we need to bust this myth. It’s been too long. Find organizations like Scientista or Sally Ride Science that help encourage women and girls in STEM interests. Find mentors and connect with other women interested in STEM. 

This’s true. Especially since computers really got up and going during WWII and most of the available workforce was, you guessed it, women. At Bletchley Park, for example, women outnumbered men 4 to 1.

BLACK GIRLS CODE

BLACK GIRLS COOOOODDEEEEE

(via the-feminist-fangirl)

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ C → cuban-american
"I was on a plane watching a documentary about Diana Vreeland, who was the editor of Vogue for years, who is incredible […] They asked her ‘How do you get to be Diana Vreeland?’ and her response was ‘Well, darling, first you have to arrange to be born in Paris!’ And that worked for her, and that’s great, but if someone were to ask me, I’d say: First, you’d have to arrange to be born in the Bronx, to two brilliant, fantastic, Cuban immigrants who taught me grace under fire…sometimes quite literally, ‘cause it was the Bronx…who taught me that work was a blessing and not a chore, who taught me that you determine your self worth and that you tell people who you are…they don’t get to tell you." - Gina Torres

(via themarysue)